Hours:
Mon.-Sat. 12-9p
Sun. Closed

Phone: 440-777-3122
Fax: 440-777-3124

26751 Brookpark Road Extension
Cherandon Plaza 2
North Olmsted, Ohio 44070
Map/Directions

Email


Piercing

Your New Piercing: By choosing Body Anthology, you can be assured that your piercing has been performed appropriately, and that the very highest standards of technique and sterilization have been used.

All of our suggestions are made based on our own experience, research, and also on that of other professionals in the piercing industry. Since you have already trusted us to perform your piercing, please follow through and follow our judgment regarding care of your new adornment. What follows is a general outline of information regarding a new piercing. For more detailed information, please do not hesitate to call or email us.

Facial and Body

What to Expect: Your Piercing…
Ø May be slightly swollen, bruised, and tender for a few weeks.
Ø May bleed slightly
Ø Will typically show a small amount of redness while healing
Ø Will typically have a slight discharge, whitish yellow in color, which can form into a crust on the jewelry. These “crusties” are the body’s waste material generated from the healing process.

What About Infection?: An infection is caused by contact with bacteria, fungi, or other similar living pathogens. The chances of your piercing becoming infected are very minimal if appropriate precautions are taken. Most piercing infections are a direct result of:
Ø Touching the piercing or jewelry with unwashed hands; yours or someone else’s.
Ø Oral contact with the piercing.
Ø Contact with other people’s bodily fluids during the healing period.
Ø Contact with hair, cosmetic products, dirty clothes or dirty bedding.
Ø Submersion in a pool, hot tub or lake during the first month.

Signs of Infection: Although these signs may indicate other problems, common signs of an infection are:
Ø Severe redness.
Ø Swelling or hardness around the piercing.
Ø Pain, particularly throbbing pain.
Ø Warm to the touch
Ø Thick discharge; yellow or green in color.

What if I Suspect an Infection? Do not remove the jewelry! Doing so can create an even larger problem by trapping matter inside the piercing, and closing off access to the infected area. A visit to your piercer may shed light on the situation; however, the only people who can diagnose or treat infections are physicians. An infection in a piercing can lead to more serious complications if left untreated.

What About Rejection?: Not every piercing can be healed successfully. Variations in anatomy, physiology and environment cannot always be predetermined. All piercings have the potential to reject (migrate, grow out, etc.) although some are more likely to do so than others. When a piercing rejects, the jewelry may appear to be moving to the surface, or the piercing may become shallower and shallower. The piercing site may be red and a clear discharge may be present. Pain is generally not associated with the rejection of a piercing. If you are concerned about rejection, we suggest letting your piercer examine the piercing.

What Else Helps a Piercing Heal?: Generally speaking, leave your piercing alone. The more friction, movement, or contact a piercing experiences, the more likely the chances are a problem will occur. Second, eating in a healthy and nutritious manner is crucial. The general health of your body is an important factor in the length of time it will take to heal a piercing. Lastly, avoid over-cleaning, or the use of inappropriate substances or cleansers. Products such as antibiotic ointments, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, Bactine, or ear care type antiseptics are typically going to do more harm than good to a healing piercing.

Hints and Tips:
Jewelry:
Ø Unless there is a problem with the size, style, or material of the initial jewelry, leaves it in place for the entire healing period.
Ø Contact your piercer if your jewelry must be temporarily removed (such as for a medical procedure). There are non-metallic jewelry alternatives.
Ø Leave jewelry in at all times. Even old, well-healed piercings can shrink or close in minutes after having been there for years!
Ø With clean hands be sure to regularly check the threaded ends on your jewelry for tightness. (“Righty-Tighty / Lefty-Loosey”).
Ø Carry a clean spare ball in case of loss or breakage.
Ø Should you decide you no longer want the piercing, seek professional help in the removal of the jewelry and continue cleaning the piercing until the hole closes. In most cases only a small indentation will remain.
Ø Use the T-shirt trick: dress your pillow in a large, clean T-shirt and turn it nightly; one clean T-shirt provides four clean surfaces for sleeping.
Ø Maintain cleanliness of telephones, headphones, eyeglasses, helmets, hats and anything that contacts the piercing area.
Ø Use caution when styling your hair and advise your stylist of a new or healing piercing.

Healing Times: Healing times can vary greatly, depending on several factors, including the initial jewelry style and gauge. Aftercare should continue until the discharge of waste material ceases, and/or the redness directly around the piercing disappears. If in doubt, contact your piercer.

Cleaning and Maintenance of a New Piercing: Cleaning with the soap is to be performed once a day, and is generally considered to be easiest to do in the shower. We suggest the use of a mild, liquid antibacterial / antifungal soap, such as Softsoap, Almay, Provon, or Satin.
Ø Wash your hands before touching the piercing while it is healing. Touching your piercing with dirty hands is the easiest way to get an infection.
Ø Remove any crusted matter from the jewelry and/or the area surrounding the piercing. This can be done with a cotton swap saturated with warm water.
Ø Place a small amount of soap on your fingertips.
Ø Lather the soap around the piercing and into the jewelry.
Ø Wait 30-60 seconds, and then let warm water run over the piercing, and work the jewelry back and forth 4-6 times to thoroughly rinse the soap out and off your skin.
Ø Support the skin near the piercing when moving the jewelry. Note: This is the only time you should rotate the jewelry through the piercing. Rotating the jewelry in any other way can drag dried material into the piercing, which will damage healing tissue, or bacteria that can cause an infection.
Ø Dry the area with cotton swabs or gauze.

Performing a Sea Salt soak once a day has been shown to facilitate healing. Do this the opposite end of the day that you take your shower.
Ø Dissolve 1/8 teaspoon of non-iodized / non-refined sea salt in 8oz. Of warm to hot water, preferably bottled or purified water.
Ø Form a seal, or vacuum, with the edge of the glass against the skin.
Ø Soak for 5-10 minutes.
Ø Dry with cotton swabs or gauze.

Most Importantly: Nobody can predict the future…if you encounter a problem, or a question arises regarding your piercing, feel free to contact us at any time. This brief overview of post-piercing information may not cover a particular concern that you may have. For that reason, we are always available for individual consultation, and happy to answer anymore in-depth questions that you may have.

PLEASE NOTE

Any suggestions made regarding aftercare, whether given verbally or printed, are not to be mistaken for, construed as, or substituted for, medical advice.

Oral and Lip

What to Expect: Your Piercing:
Ø For the first three to five days: significant swelling, light bleeding, bruising, and/or tenderness.
Ø After that: Some swelling, light secretion of a whitish-yellow fluid (not puss)
Ø A piercing may seem healed before healing is complete. This is because piercings heal from the inside out, and although it feels healed, the tissue remains fragile on the inside. BE PATIENT, and keep cleaning throughout the entire healing period.
Ø Even healed piercings can shrink or close in minutes after having been there for years! This varies from person to person; if you like your piercing, leave the jewelry in place.

What About Infection?: An infection is caused by contact with bacteria, fungi, or other similar living pathogens. The chances of your piercing becoming infected are very minimal if appropriate precautions are taken. Most piercing infections are a direct result of:
Ø Touching the piercing or jewelry with unwashed hands; yours or someone else’s.
Ø Contact with other people’s bodily fluids during the healing period.
Ø Contact with hair, cosmetic products, dirty clothes or dirty bedding.
Ø Submersion in a pool, hot tub or lake during the first month.

Signs of Infection: Although these signs may indicate other problems, common signs of an infection are:
Ø Severe redness.
Ø Swelling or hardness around the piercing.
Ø Pain, particularly throbbing pain.
Ø Warm to the touch
Ø Thick discharge; yellow or green in color.

What if I Suspect an Infection? Do not remove the jewelry! Doing so can create an even larger problem by trapping matter inside the piercing, and closing off access to the infected area. A visit to your piercer may shed light on the situation; however, the only people who can diagnose or treat infections are physicians. An infection in a piercing can lead to more serious complications if left untreated.

What About Rejection?: Not every piercing can be healed successfully. Variations in anatomy, physiology and environment cannot always be predetermined. All piercings have the potential to reject (migrate, grow out, etc.) although some are more likely to do so than others. When a piercing rejects, the jewelry may appear to be moving to the surface, or the piercing may become shallower and shallower. The piercing site may be red and a clear discharge may be present. Pain is generally not associated with the rejection of a piercing. If you are concerned about rejection, we suggest letting your piercer examine the piercing.

What Else Helps a Piercing Heal?: Generally speaking, leave your piercing alone. The more friction, movement, or contact a piercing experiences, the more likely the chances are a problem will occur. Second, eating in a healthy and nutritious manner is crucial. The general health of your body is an important factor in the length of time it will take to heal a piercing. Lastly, avoid over-cleaning, or the use of inappropriate substances or cleansers. Products such as antibiotic ointments, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, Bactine, or ear care type antiseptics are typically going to do more harm than good to a healing piercing.

Hints and Tips:
To help reduce swelling:
Ø Freeze bottled or purified water. Crush the ice and let it dissolve in your mouth (do not suck on the ice) and/or drink ice water.
Ø Sleep with your head elevated above your heart during the first few nights.
To maintain good oral hygiene:
Ø Use a new soft-bristled toothbrush and keep it clean.
Ø Brush your teeth, and use the mouthwash after every meal.
Ø During healing; floss daily, and gently brush your teeth, tongue, and jewelry. Once healed, brush the jewelry more thoroughly to avoid plaque build-up.

What to avoid:
Ø DO NOT PLAY WITH THE JEWELRY! Long term effects of playing with and clicking the jewelry with teeth can result in permanent damage to teeth and other oral structures.
Ø Avoid undue trauma; excessive talking and playing with the jewelry during healing can cause the formation of unsightly and uncomfortable scar tissue, migration, and other complications.
Ø Avoid oral sexual contact including French (wet) kissing or oral sex during healing (even with a long term partner).
Ø Avoid chewing on gum, fingernails, pencils, etc.
Ø Avoid sharing plates, cups, and eating utensils.
Ø Avoid smoking! It increases risks and lengthens healing time.
Ø Avoid stress and recreational drug use.
Ø Avoid any aspirin or alcohol, and large amounts of caffeine.
Ø Avoid submerging in bodies of water such as lakes, pools, etc.

Jewelry:
Ø Once the swelling has subsided, it is vital to replace the original, longer jewelry with a shorter post.
Ø Be sure to regularly check threaded ends on your jewelry for tightness (“Righty-Tighty, Lefty-Loosey”)Ø Carry a clean spare ball in case of loss or breakage.
Ø Contact your piercer if your jewelry must be temporarily removed (such as for medical procedures). There are non-metallic jewelry alternatives.
Ø Should you decide you no longer want the piercing, seek professional helping the removal of the jewelry and continue cleaning the piercing until the hole has closed. In most cases only a small indentation will remain.

Eating:
Ø Slowly eat small bites of food, placed directly onto the molars.
Ø Avoid eating spicy, salty, acidic, or hot in temperature foods or beverages for a few days.
Ø For tongue piercings, try to keep your tongue leveling your mouth as you chew and swallow.
Ø For Labret (cheek and lip) piercings, be cautious about opening your mouth too wide as this can result in the backing of the jewelry catching on your teeth.

Healing Times: Healing times can vary greatly, depending on several factors, including the initial jewelry style and gauge. Aftercare should continue until the discharge of waste material ceases, and/or the redness directly around the piercing disappears. If in doubt, contact your piercer.

Cleaning and Maintenance of a New Piercing:
Cleaning with the soap (exterior) is to be performed once a day, and is generally considered to be easiest to do in the shower. We suggest the use of a mild, liquid antibacterial / antifungal soap, such as Softsoap, Almay, Provon, or Satin.
Ø Wash your hands before touching the piercing while it is healing. Touching your piercing with dirty hands is the easiest way to get an infection.
Ø Remove any crusted matter from the jewelry and/or the area surrounding the piercing. This can be done with a cotton swap saturated with warm water.
Ø Place a small amount of soap on your fingertips.
Ø Lather the soap around the piercing and into the jewelry.
Ø Wait 30-60 seconds, and then let warm water run over the piercing, and work the jewelry back and forth 4-6 times to thoroughly rinse the soap out and off your skin.
Ø Support the skin near the piercing when moving the jewelry. Note: This is the only time you should rotate the jewelry through the piercing. Rotating the jewelry in any other way can drag dried material into the piercing, which will damage healing tissue, or bacteria that can cause an infection.
Ø Dry the area with cotton swabs or gauze.
Performing a Sea Salt soak once a day (exterior) has been shown to facilitate healing. Do the soak on the opposite end of the day that you take your shower.
Ø Dissolve 1/8 teaspoon of non-iodized / non-refined sea salt in 8oz. Of warm to hot water, preferably bottled or purified water.
Ø Form a seal, or vacuum, with the edge of the glass against the skin.
Ø Soak for 5-10 minutes.
Ø Dry with cotton swabs or gauze.

Cleaning the inside tissue and tongue: Rinse no more than 4-6 times a day with an antibacterial / alcohol free mouth rinse such as tech 2000, Biotene, or Rembrandt. Rinsing with the mouth wash should be done for 30-60 seconds. Rinse with a sea salt solution (Dissolve 1/8 of a teaspoon in 8 oz. Of warm/hot water twice a day (morning/night) for 1 minute.

Most Importantly: Nobody can predict the future…if you encounter a problem, or a question arises regarding your piercing, feel free to contact us at any time. This brief overview of post-piercing information may not cover a particular concern that you may have. For that reason, we are always available for individual consultation, and happy to answer anymore in-depth questions that you may have.

PLEASE NOTE

Any suggestions made regarding aftercare, whether given verbally or printed, are not to be mistaken for, construed as, or substituted for, medical advice.

Genital

What to Expect: Your Piercing:
Ø May be slightly swollen, bruised, and tender for a few weeks.
Ø May bleed slightly
Ø Will typically show a small amount of redness while healing
Ø Will typically have a slight discharge, whitish yellow in color, which can form into a crust on the jewelry. These “crusties” are the body’s waste material generated from the healing process.

What About Infection?: An infection is caused by contact with bacteria, fungi, or other similar living pathogens. The chances of your piercing becoming infected are very minimal if appropriate precautions are taken. Most piercing infections are a direct result of:
Ø Touching the piercing or jewelry with unwashed hands; yours or someone else’s.
Ø Oral contact with the piercing.
Ø Contact with other people’s bodily fluids during the healing period.
Ø Contact with hair, cosmetic products, dirty clothes or dirty bedding.
Ø Submersion in a pool, hot tub or lake during the first month.

Signs of Infection: Although these signs may indicate other problems, common signs of an infection are:
Ø Severe redness.
Ø Swelling or hardness around the piercing.
Ø Pain, particularly throbbing pain.
Ø Warm to the touch
Ø Thick discharge; yellow or green in color.

What if I Suspect an Infection? Do not remove the jewelry! Doing so can create an even larger problem by trapping matter inside the piercing, and closing off access to the infected area. A visit to your piercer may shed light on the situation; however, the only people who can diagnose or treat infections are physicians. An infection in a piercing can lead to more serious complications if left untreated.

What About Rejection?: Not every piercing can be healed successfully. Variations in anatomy, physiology and environment cannot always be predetermined. All piercings have the potential to reject (migrate, grow out, etc.) although some are more likely to do so than others. When a piercing rejects, the jewelry may appear to be moving to the surface, or the piercing may become shallower and shallower. The piercing site may be red and a clear discharge may be present. Pain is generally not associated with the rejection of a piercing. If you are concerned about rejection, we suggest letting your piercer examine the piercing.

What Else Helps a Piercing Heal?: Generally speaking, leave your piercing alone. The more friction, movement, or contact a piercing experiences, the more likely the chances are a problem will occur. Second, eating in a healthy and nutritious manner is crucial. The general health of your body is an important factor in the length of time it will take to heal a piercing. Lastly, avoid over-cleaning, or the use of inappropriate substances or cleansers. Products such as antibiotic ointments, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, Bactine, or ear care type antiseptics are typically going to do more harm than good to a healing piercing.

Hints and Tips:
Jewelry:

Ø Unless there is a problem with the size, style, or material of the initial jewelry, leaves it in place for the entire healing period.
Ø Contact your piercer if your jewelry must be temporarily removed (such as for a medical procedure). There are non-metallic jewelry alternatives.
Ø Leave jewelry in at all times. Even old, well-healed piercings can shrink or close in minutes after having been there for years!
Ø With clean hands be sure to regularly check the threaded ends on your jewelry for tightness. (“Righty-Tighty / Lefty-Loosey”).
Ø Carry a clean spare ball in case of loss or breakage.
Ø Should you decide you no longer want the piercing, seek professional help in the removal of the jewelry and continue cleaning the piercing until the hole closes. In most cases only a small indentation will remain.
Ø In most cases you can engage in sexual activity as soon as you feel ready. Comfort and hygiene are vital.
Ø During healing all sexual activities must be gentle. To increase comfort and decrease trauma, soak in sea salt to remove any crusty matter, prior to sexual activity.
Ø Use barriers such as condoms or dental dams to avoid contact with a partner’s bodily fluids, even in long term relationships.
Ø Use clean disposable barriers on sex toys.
Ø Use a new container of water based lubricant. *Do not use your own saliva as a lubricant.
Ø After sex, an additional sea salt soak or clean water rinse is suggested.
Ø Prince Albert and Apadravya piercing can bleed freely for the first few days.
Ø If using soap, urinate after cleaning any piercing that is near the urethra.

Healing Times: Healing times can vary greatly, depending on several factors, including the initial jewelry style and gauge. Aftercare should continue until the discharge of waste material ceases, and/or the redness directly around the piercing disappears. If in doubt, contact your piercer.

Cleaning and Maintenance of a New Piercing: Cleaning with the soap is to be performed once a day, and is generally considered to be easiest to do in the shower. We suggest the use of a mild, liquid antibacterial / antifungal soap, such as Softsoap, Almay, Provon, or Satin.
Ø Wash your hands before touching the piercing while it is healing. Touching your piercing with dirty hands is the easiest way to get an infection.
Ø Remove any crusted matter from the jewelry and/or the area surrounding the piercing. This can be done with a cotton swap saturated with warm water.
Ø Place a small amount of soap on your fingertips.
Ø Lather the soap around the piercing and into the jewelry.
Ø Wait 30-60 seconds, and then let warm water run over the piercing, and work the jewelry back and forth 4-6 times to thoroughly rinse the soap out and off your skin.
Ø Support the skin near the piercing when moving the jewelry. Note: This is the only time you should rotate the jewelry through the piercing. Rotating the jewelry in any other way can drag dried material into the piercing, which will damage healing tissue, or bacteria that can cause an infection.
Ø Dry the area with cotton swabs or gauze. Performing a Sea Salt soak once a day has been shown to facilitate healing. Do this the opposite end of the day that you take your shower.
Ø Dissolve 1/8 teaspoon of non-iodized / non-refined sea salt in 8oz. Of warm to hot water, preferably bottled or purified water.
Ø Form a seal, or vacuum, with the edge of the glass against the skin.
Ø Soak for 5-10 minutes.
Ø Dry with cotton swabs or gauze.

Most Importantly: Nobody can predict the future…if you encounter a problem, or a question arises regarding your piercing, feel free to contact us at any time. This brief overview of post-piercing information may not cover a particular concern that you may have. For that reason, we are always available for individual consultation, and happy to answer anymore in-depth questions that you may have.

PLEASE NOTE

Any suggestions made regarding aftercare, whether given verbally or printed, are not to be mistaken for, construed as, or substituted for, medical advice.